THE  DIFFERENCE  BETWEEN  THE  MIDLAND  SYNTECH  AND  A.W.A.  RT-85
COMMON  AREAS:

The Midland Syntech 1 radios ("ST1") and the A.W.A. RT-85 share the same Hitachi synthesiser/exciter and receiver PCB assemblies, and
both radios use the Z-273 EPROM module.

THE  MAIN  DIFFERENCES:

Transceiver case/chassis/heatsink.
PA assembly.
Microprocessor code and Z-273 data storage.
Configuration.
MINOR  DIFFERENCES:

There are numerous "features" differences, most of which don't warrant much comment, such as:

Microphone.
Scan groups and patterns.
Low power.
Display.
Antenna connector.
MY  PERSONAL  OPINION  OF  THE  RELATIVE  MERITS  OF  THE  TWO  RADIOS:

The typical RT-85 PA is struggling to deliver at
the 25 Watt output level, and the APC (power level control) is flat out.  By comparison, the ST1's APC is backed off a fair bit at this level and - apart from stressing the output device less - provides far better protection against adverse SWR.

Midland scanning modes are flexible, but confusing to many users, and the standard radio is delivered without the front panel controls to support scanning.

Display auto-blanking on the RT-85 is b$##@y annoying.  While it is painful to fit a mod into the head to defeat it, that is the lesser pain.  Whatever possessed A.W.A.'s engineers to specify this as a non-programmable "feature" remains one of life's great mysteries.

The RT-85 is 80-channel capable, despite the RT-85 service manual and sales brochures stating 64 channels.  Again, why A.W.A. persisted with this myth remains a mystery.

The frequency response of the RT-85 mic amp did not roll off fast enough at the low frequency end.  As a result, some RT-85 users experienced talk-off on CTCSS-equipped repeaters which we could not replicate when they used the ST1. (G'day Ron!)

The Auxiliary connector on the RT-85 lends itself to a host of "systems" add-ons and applications.

 
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